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Cambridge School Classics Project Blog

Caroline Bristow
CSCP Team

I am the current Director of the Cambridge School Classics Project and have been involved in outreach work, especially in terms of access to Classics and to Higher Education, since my time as an undergraduate and then postgraduate student at Oxford University where I read Ancient and Modern History. Previous to this I was the Classics and Religious Studies Subject Specialist at the exam board OCR (part of Cambridge Assessment). I have taught a variety of subjects in the UK state sector at GCSE, AS and A Level, including Classical Civilisation, Classical Greek, Religious Studies, Philosophy and Anthropology. Each summer I teach on the JSST Repton Summer School, to get a small 'fix' of classroom time.

The story's the thing...

From Quintus' little sister to the introduction of Barbillus as amīcus in Book I, there's lots to look forward to in the new edition. In this post, Director Caroline Bristow reflects on the narrative that students and teachers love and the changes you can expect from the new UK and International edition.

The front cover of the book 'Amarantus and his neighbourhood', featuring an illustration of a bar filled with characters from the book.

KS3 History with Amarantus and his neighbours

CSCP is delighted to have launched its new KS3 History project Amarantus and his neighbourhood. In these short videos Director Caroline Bristow explains how to use the new materials and introduces the newest member of the CSCP familia.

A photograph from the 2018 production of Medea at Keble College, Oxford.

Scholarship for the Classroom: BAME Medea

In the first of our "Scholarship for the Classroom" pieces, Caroline Bristow looks at how 2018's BAME Medea production in Oxford can be used as a piece of scholarship for A Level Classical Civilisation, and provides links to the resources and discussion surrounding it.

salvete omnes: the importance of welcoming everyone

Director Caroline Bristow addresses the importance of inclusion to the core mission of CSCP: ensuring that Classics flourishes in classrooms. This article also introduces the theme of race and decolonisation which will be the focus of this blog’s opening series of posts.